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U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. John Hawkins, left, assists Sgt. Joshua C. Sutton fire a FIM-92 Stinger missile at his target at Onslow Beach, North Carolina, May 22, 2019. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jason Estevez)
WASHINGTON: Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February, the US Department of Defense has transferred billions of dollars-worth of weapons and equipment to Ukrainian forces, from drones to artillery.
It’s an unprecedented flow of weapons that has shocked outside observers used to the US having to work through a famously slow arms transfer bureaucracy. It has also enabled Ukraine to not only survive the initial Russian push, but actually reclaim territory.
As a result, the Russians appear to have changed their goals, from trying to capture and pacify the whole country to trying to consolidate its control of the Donbas region. And with that change comes a change in what the US is looking to supply to Kyiv. Read more about the latest on the US-led effort, and how it’s changing, in this new Breaking Defense report:
For now, here’s what the Pentagon said it has sent:
US aid to Ukraine, based on Department of Defense announcements. (Graphic by Breaking Defense)
RI&S’ ABI demonstration produces targeting quality accuracy in seconds
RI&S’ ABI demonstration produces targeting quality accuracy in seconds
“Getting the airplanes is about a two-year process, and then modifying them is another two year process,” Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall said Tuesday. “There are things that we could do, however, to maybe get access to aircraft earlier one way or another.”
By Valerie Insinna
Topics: infographic, Russia, Ukraine
Information superiority and speed to mission are the hallmark of multi-cloud environments, along with automation, cybersecurity, and governance.
Information superiority and speed to mission are the hallmark of multi-cloud environments, along with automation, cybersecurity, and governance.
Success can only be achieved by finding common ground between the US government’s desire for MOSA and industry’s incentive to modify its current business cases.  
Success can only be achieved by finding common ground between the US government’s desire for MOSA and industry’s incentive to modify its current business cases.  
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In this Game Changer article, we discuss how Internet Operations Management addresses the issue of centralized visibility and operational control.
In this Game Changer article, we discuss how Internet Operations Management addresses the issue of centralized visibility and operational control.
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