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Updated 29 March 2022

© Crown copyright 2022
This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0 except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: [email protected].
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This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/inclusive-transport-strategy-scorecard/inclusive-transport-strategy-scorecard-background-information-and-accompanying-infographics
The Inclusive Transport Strategy (ITS) sets out our plans to make our transport system more inclusive and travel easier for disabled people. Our vision is for disabled people to have the same access to transport as everyone else. They will travel confidently, easily and without extra cost.
We commissioned the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen) to carry out an evaluation of the ITS. This scorecard forms part of its overall evaluation and monitors change in metrics relating to disabled people’s travel.
The scorecard consists of a table of 23 different metrics. Here we provide background information and accompanying infographics on the latest scorecard year (2020 to 21). This is intended to be viewed alongside the scorecard table. The content presented on this page will be updated once a year up until 2024, to reflect the latest annual figures.
The data sources for each metric, as well as further information about the purpose and content of the scorecard can be found later in this document. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, data collection was not possible for all 23 metrics used in the scorecard. For this reason, the 2020 to 2021 scorecard does not display any data for metrics 7 to 12 and 15 to 16[footnote 1].
The following changes in scorecard metrics can be observed between the 2019 to 2020 and 2020 to 2021 scorecard years:
It should be noted that the observed changes cannot be attributed to ITS actions, although ITS actions may have played a role. It is likely that the COVID-19 pandemic contributed towards some of the observed changes.
The ITS aims to create equal access to transport for all. Disabled people should have the same access to transport as everybody else, be able to go where everyone else goes and do so easily, confidently and without extra cost.
The infographics in theme 1 represent metrics 1 to 6 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 2].
The ITS aims to ensure disabled people receive a supportive travelling experience on all modes of transport. We believe budgets, training and resources should be directed to the areas and services that help provide the greatest improvements to the experience of disabled passengers.
Theme 2 draws on the following metrics:
It was not possible to obtain this data for the 2020 to 21 scorecard due to the COVID-19 pandemic[footnote 1].
The ITS aims to raise awareness and enforcement of passenger rights so that disabled travellers know where to access information about their rights, the obligations of transport operators and how to raise complaints.
This infographic represents metrics 13 to 14 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 3].
The ITS aims to ensure that staff interactions become more consistent. Providing effective training to transport staff is one of the best ways to improve the travelling experience of disabled passengers. Positive interactions with staff can help build the confidence of disabled people to travel.
Theme 4 draws on the following metrics:
It was not possible to obtain this data for the 2020 to 21 scorecard due to the COVID-19 pandemic[footnote 1].
The ITS aims to ensure assistance is provided if physical infrastructure remains a barrier. Providing timely and high-quality assistance services to disabled travellers, including those with less visible disabilities, is vital to ensure disabled people can travel with confidence.
This infographic represents metric 17 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 4].
This infographic represents metric 18 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 5].
The ITS aims to ensure that vehicles are designed, built and operated using guidance and regulations, so that they are easy to use for all.
This infographic represents metrics 19 to 20 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 6].
This infographic represents metric 21 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 7].
The ITS aims to ensure that that transport operators provide travel information in formats that all passengers can easily access and understand, before and during a journey. We want disabled people to have equal access to transport information.
This infographic represents metric 22 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 8].
The ITS aims to create an inclusive travelling experience for disabled people. This will involve improving the attitude and behaviour of other passengers to ensure disabled people feel confident taking journeys.
This infographic represents metric 23 of the 2020 to 2021 scorecard[footnote 9].
An initial review of all data sources covering disabled people’s transport habits within Britain found over 75 relevant metrics. The 23 metrics included in the scorecard were chosen based on:
The 23 metrics have been split into 8 different themes based on the logic model developed by the Department for Transport (DfT) as part of its monitoring and evaluation framework. Logic models are evaluation tools that can be used to explore whether expected changes have occurred. They involve breaking a policy down into its constituent elements.
The metrics associated with each theme are detailed in the infographics. The metric number can be viewed in the first column of the scorecard table. The 8 themes cover specific aspects of the original logic model.
Themes:
The scorecard table presents figures for 3 baseline years, where data for those years was available (2016 to 2017, 2017 to 2018, 2018 to 2019). These baseline figures are displayed to provide a reference point for data collected since the ITS was published in July 2018. The table also presents figures for the first 2 ITS scorecard years (2019 to 2020 and 2020 to 2021). Subject to any further limitations in data collected during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, this table will be updated annually until 2024 so that we can monitor changes in these metrics over time.
It is important to note that any change that is observed may not be directly attributed to the ITS and associated activities.
The scorecard’s years are in financial years (April to March). We have attempted to ensure that all figures follow this structure. However, this was not possible for metrics 1 to 6 due to data availability.
Where annual figures are displayed, figures from:
Baseline data (data from before ITS publication) was not available for some metrics. This is indicated by cells containing the text ‘No data’. This might be due to specific data not being collected that year, or because of methodological changes to surveys which meant comparison of figures was not possible.
It is possible that data will continue to be unavailable for certain metrics in future scorecard years because of the impact of the pandemic on data collection. It is also possible that the data drawn on by metrics 7 to 12 and 15 to 16[footnote 10] will be collected using a new methodology, so results prior to and from 2020 to 21 may not be directly comparable. This may mean we will have to reconsider how we monitor the ITS in future years.
Certain surveys have not run since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, due to significant reductions in the numbers of people using public transport or because it has not been safe enough to conduct face-to-face interviewing. For this reason, the 2020 to 2021 scorecard does not display any data for metrics 7 to 12 and 15 to 16. This is indicated by cells containing the text ‘No data’. This data is expected to be available again in future scorecard years. Surveys which have not run are the Bus Passenger Survey, the National Rail Passenger Survey, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency Disabled Passenger Satisfaction Survey, the Strategic Road User Survey and the Motorway Services User Survey  2 3 4
Metrics 1 to 6 represent data taken from the National Travel Survey (not in the public domain). The survey ran between January and December 2020. It was conducted in England and published by DfT. For metrics 3 to 6 the age split was used on the basis that 60 is the age at which it is possible to start claiming free and discounted travel. 
Metrics 13 to 14 represent data taken from Bus Users UK (not in the public domain) and the Office of Rail and Road consumer report. Both datasets were collected in Great Britain between 2020 and 2021. 
Metric 17 represents passenger assistance data provided by the Office of Rail and Road. The data was collected in Great Britain between 2020 and 2021. 
Metric 18 represents data taken from the autumn waves of the Civil Aviation Authority Consumer Survey. The survey ran between 13 November and 8 December 2020. It was collected in the United Kingdom. 
Metrics 19 to 20 represent Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle Statistics. The data was collected in England and published by DfT as at 31 March 2021. 
Metric 21 represents data held by DfT, as at 31 March 2021 and is not in the public domain. The data was collected in England. 
Metric 22 represents local bus operator data held by DfT, as at 31 March 2021. The data was collected in Great Britain. 
Metric 23 represents data taken from the National Travel Attitudes Survey. The survey ran between January and February 2021. It was conducted in England and published by DfT
In future scorecard years, it is possible that the data drawn on by certain metrics will be collected using a new methodology, so results prior to and from 2020 to 21 may not be directly comparable for metric 7 (percentage of disabled people who were satisfied with their bus journey), metric 8 (percentage of disabled people who were satisfied with their train journey), metric 9 (percentage of disabled people who were satisfied with their ferry journey), metric 10 (percentage of disabled people who were satisfied with their cruise journey), metric 11 (percentage of disabled people who were satisfied with motorways and major ‘A’ roads), metric 12 (percentage of disabled people who were satisfied with motorway service stations), metric 15 (percentage of disabled people who were satisfied with the helpfulness and attitude of the bus driver on their journey), and metric 16 (percentage of disabled people who thought the helpfulness and attitude of staff on their train was very/fairly good). 
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